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Artemis 1 lunar launch won’t happen until SATURDAY: NASA pushes date back for second time

NASA will attempt to launch the Artemis-1 rocket again on Saturday, September 3 after scrubbing its first attempt on Monday. The historic launch was postponed after an engine bleed could not be repaired.

The launch of the most powerful rocket the world has ever seen for a mission to the moon is scheduled to resume on Saturday at 2:17 p.m. Eastern time with a two-hour window, NASA told reporters on Tuesday.

According to the agency, a liquid hydrogen fuel line failed to properly cool one of the four Space Launch System (SLS) core stage engines, which are part of the preparations required before the engine can ignite. However, NASA said there was no need to replace the engine.

Officials clarified Tuesday that the engine has nothing else physically to prevent it from cooling properly, but they suspect a sensor is defective.

NASA scrubbed the Artemis I mission at 8:35 a.m. ET due to a leaking engine not reaching proper temperature. This was to be tested at the final dress rehearsal in June, but a separate fuel leak interrupted the event

NASA scrubbed the Artemis I mission at 8:35 a.m. ET due to a leaking engine not reaching proper temperature. This was to be tested at the final dress rehearsal in June, but a separate fuel leak interrupted the event

How the mission will work: NASA plans to launch the most powerful rocket the world has ever seen for a mission to the moon

How the mission will work: NASA plans to launch the most powerful rocket the world has ever seen for a mission to the moon

John Honeycutt, manager of the agency’s Space Launch System (SLS) program, said Tuesday that the engine causing the delay — Engine 3 — was about 30 to 40 degrees (Fahrenheit) warmer than the other three engines. The goal was for all four engines to reach minus 420 degrees Fahrenheit.

According to Honeycutt, “it’s not very uncommon” for a sensor to be off 30 to 40 degrees, but found that the reading didn’t match what was expected based on the physics of the situation.

Replacing the sensor before Saturday’s launch attempt is not possible, NASA officials said. Instead, the team behind the latest mission to the moon is about 30 to 45 minutes earlier than the previous attempt on its “hydrogen bleed” — the process by which hydrogen is circulated to cool the engines in preparation for flight.

Officials stressed that in anticipation of similar results from the sensor, they will “continue to shower data from the first launch attempt.”

The leaking engine was identified along with a crack in the core stage at approximately 7:30 p.m. ET. NASA immediately stopped the clock at T-minus 40 minutes

The leaking engine was identified along with a crack in the core stage at approximately 7:30 p.m. ET. NASA immediately stopped the clock at T-minus 40 minutes

Another potential obstacle to a Saturday start is the weather.

Launch Weather Officer Mark Berger said Tuesday there was a 60 percent chance of a weather breach on Saturday. Showers and possible thunderstorms are forecast for the weekend in the area.

Artemis I is currently sitting on Launchpad 39B at Kennedy Space Center in Florida along with its Space Launch System rocket and the Orion spacecraft, awaiting its second chance. The Center is located in Cape Canaveral, about an hour east of Orlando.

Berger said he is “optimistic” the designated two-hour window in the afternoon will feature clear skies as inland winds away from the coastal launch are expected.

The Atlantic did not have a storm for the whole of August, marking it as one of the calmest periods in history in a month that typically produces the most storms and hurricanes. That calm is expected to end over Labor Day weekend as two weather systems off the Atlantic coast — where Artemis 1 sits — have the potential to turn into the season’s next major tropical storm or hurricane.

Tropical depressions can be difficult to predict at such an early stage, but models have shown that if one of the systems gains power, it could fly to Bermuda and then potentially to the US east coast. This system has an 80% chance of forming in the next five days.

A weather system that formed over the Atlantic has an 80 percent chance of turning into a tropical storm by Friday

A weather system that formed over the Atlantic has an 80 percent chance of turning into a tropical storm by Friday

Also in attendance was US Vice President Kamal Harris, who offered words of support to NASA and the Americans who tuned in to the event. She said the peel allows NASA to ensure the rocket can be launched safely next time

Also in attendance was US Vice President Kamal Harris, who offered words of support to NASA and the Americans who tuned in to the event. She said the peel allows NASA to ensure the rocket can be launched safely next time

A sea of ​​disappointed viewers are making their way home after the Artemis I mission was scrubbed at 8:35 a.m. ET Monday. NASA said there was a leak in Engine 5

A sea of ​​disappointed viewers are making their way home after the Artemis I mission was scrubbed at 8:35 a.m. ET Monday. NASA said there was a leak in Engine 5

Tens of thousands of people who flocked to Cape Canaveral before sunrise Monday went home disappointed after the mission was scrubbed. Among them was Vice President Kamal Harris, who supported those disappointed by the cancellation, noting that it gives NASA more data to ensure the SLS can lift off on its second attempt.

“I am so proud of what is happening with our space program and the leadership that United Space is providing to the world,” Harris said shortly after Artemis I was grounded.

“The Artemis program is the beginning of the next era of what we have long been doing. To provide vision and inspiring innovation in a way that benefits all of humanity and all women.’

Vice President Kamal Harris was also among hundreds of thousands who watched the event in Florida

Vice President Kamal Harris was also among hundreds of thousands who watched the event in Florida

Artemis 1 is the first of three complex missions that will pave the way for humans to return to the moon – and likely the first woman.

Artemis III, set for 2025, is scheduled to land first woman and black person on the moon.

It has been more than half a century since humans first walked on the moon when Neil Armstrong uttered those immortal words: “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” Eleven other Americans followed, including Buzz Aldrin, Alan Shepard and Eugene Cernan, but all were men.

Now NASA has narrowed the list of Artemis III astronauts down to nine female candidates.

They include a Cambridge graduate, a Navy veteran who fought in Iraq and Afghanistan and a former University of Bath rugby player who played in the English Women’s Premiership. Not to mention a helicopter-flying mother of twin girls and an animal-loving diver who dreamed of going to space at the age of five.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11162529/Artemis1-moon-launch-not-happen-SATURDAY-NASA-pushes-date-second-time.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490 Artemis 1 lunar launch won’t happen until SATURDAY: NASA pushes date back for second time

Emma Colton

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