As many as a dozen Grenfell Tower firefighters have now contracted cancer caused by inhaling pollutants

Several firefighter heroes who fought the deadly inferno at Grenfell Tower are now battling rare cancers linked to prolonged exposure to pollutants.

About a dozen firefighters who worked on the west London fire in June 2017 have since been diagnosed with cancer, an inquest by The Mirror has revealed.

But experts fear In the end, more than 20 cases could be linked to the fire, which killed 72 residents.

The accidental fire, the worst in Britain in more than a generation, was hastened by deadly combustible casings and many of those who died were told to stay at home.

Several firefighter heroes who fought the deadly inferno at Grenfell Tower are now battling rare cancers linked to prolonged exposure to pollutants. Pictured: Firefighters at Grenfell Tower, a 24-story apartment block in North Kensington on June 14, 2017

Several firefighter heroes who fought the deadly inferno at Grenfell Tower are now battling rare cancers linked to prolonged exposure to pollutants. Pictured: Firefighters at Grenfell Tower, a 24-story apartment block in North Kensington on June 14, 2017

About a dozen firefighters who worked on the west London fire (pictured) in June 2017 have since been diagnosed with cancer, but experts fear more than 20 cases could end up being linked to the blaze

About a dozen firefighters who worked on the west London fire (pictured) in June 2017 have since been diagnosed with cancer, but experts fear more than 20 cases could end up being linked to the blaze

Fire service sources told the newspaper that several Grenfell firefighters, some in their 40s, are already battling cancer.

The majority of diagnoses involved digestive cancer and leukemia. Other illnesses recorded after the tragedy include kidney failure, heart disease and stroke.

Experts say the diagnoses may be linked to “high levels of unprecedented exposure to pollutants” during the fire.

Officials are currently compiling a list of firefighters who have visited Grenfell and who have since been diagnosed with cancer.

The sources said they expect some “really depressing” and “shocking” data to be released soon, but fear it could be just the beginning as some cancers can take up to 25 years to emerge.

The majority of Grenfell firefighters' diagnoses were digestive cancer and leukaemia. Other illnesses recorded after the tragedy include kidney failure, heart disease and stroke. Pictured: Firefighters resting near Grenfell Tower on June 14, 2017

The majority of Grenfell firefighters’ diagnoses were digestive cancer and leukaemia. Other illnesses recorded after the tragedy include kidney failure, heart disease and stroke. Pictured: Firefighters resting near Grenfell Tower on June 14, 2017

Experts say the diagnoses may be linked to

Experts say the diagnoses may be linked to “high levels of unprecedented exposure to pollutants” during the fire. Pictured: Flames and thick acrid smoke rise from Grenfell Tower on June 14, 2017

Around 1,300 firefighters are believed to have been involved in the Grenfell tragedy, including both inside and outside the tower as well as those who responded in the days after the inferno. Pictured: Firefighters at the Grenfell Tower tragedy on 14 June 2017

Around 1,300 firefighters are believed to have been involved in the Grenfell tragedy, including both inside and outside the tower as well as those who responded in the days after the inferno. Pictured: Firefighters at the Grenfell Tower tragedy on 14 June 2017

Around 1,300 firefighters are believed to have been involved in the Grenfell tragedy, including both inside and outside the tower as well as those who responded in the days after the inferno.

Many firefighters who visited Grenfell were deflated in the tower, sat in contaminated suits for over 10 hours and waited in a smoky basement for up to six hours.

The heroes were spotted eating and drinking in their soot-covered protective gear, which health experts say could cause digestive cancer.

Firefighters – many of whom weren’t wearing protection – doused hotspots in the aftermath when it was believed toxins were “even more dangerous”.

A study commissioned by the Fire Brigades’ Union and the University of Central Lancashire has since found that firefighters who notice soot in their nose or throat are at least twice as likely to be diagnosed with cancer.

They are also twice as likely to be diagnosed with cancer if left in their PPE for more than four hours, as observed at Grenfell.

“This important research proves that firefighters suffer and die from cancer, stroke, heart disease and mental illness because they go to work and protect the public,” Riccardo la Torre, national official for the Fire Brigades Union, told The Mirror.

“We now know that firefighters are exposed to hazardous and life-threatening pollutants as part of their job and would certainly have been present in an incident of the size and scope of the Grenfell Tower fire.”

He confirmed the Fire Brigades Union is commissioning “further research” to call for “appropriate protection and support” for the firefighters who took part in Grenfell, as well as all other crews in the UK.

Many firefighters who visited Grenfell were deflated in the tower, sat in contaminated suits for over 10 hours and waited in a smoky basement for up to six hours. Pictured: Firefighters battle the Grenfell Tower fire on June 14, 2017

Many firefighters who visited Grenfell were deflated in the tower, sat in contaminated suits for over 10 hours and waited in a smoky basement for up to six hours. Pictured: Firefighters battle the Grenfell Tower fire on June 14, 2017

The accidental fire, the worst in Britain in more than a generation, was hastened by deadly combustible casings and many of those who died were told to stay at home

The accidental fire, the worst in Britain in more than a generation, was hastened by deadly flammable casings and many of those who died were told to stay at home

Meanwhile, the National Fire Chiefs Council told the newspaper that the safety and well-being of firefighters and the public is their “top priority”.

“The role of a firefighter is clearly one that can be dangerous and involves significant occupational hazard to protecting those in need,” the council said.

“It is recognized that firefighters are exposed to pollutants in the performance of their duties. It is recognized that the incidence of some cancers in firefighters is above average.’

The council reiterated its commitment to “ensuring the continued, enhanced safety of all firefighters, while making full use of available evidence and knowledge.”

MailOnline has reached out to the National Fire Chiefs Council and the Fire Brigades Union for comment.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11629989/Up-dozen-Grenfell-Tower-firefighters-ill-cancer-caused-inhaling-pollutants.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490 As many as a dozen Grenfell Tower firefighters have now contracted cancer caused by inhaling pollutants

Emma Colton

WSTPost is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – admin@wstpost.com. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Related Articles

Back to top button