Homeless teenager lands a place in college for his basketball skills

A teenager who spent most of his high school homeless has started his freshman year at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, after being recruited to play basketball at the historically black college.

Jeremiah Armstead, 19, was a sophomore when he moved to California with his mother, brother and sister, Fox 11 Los Angeles reported. The family has spent the last three years sleeping in their car and in domestic violence shelters.

The teenager, who graduated from Long Beach Polytechnic High School this spring, began his freshman semester at Fisk earlier this month.

“I’m not surprised that Jeremiah is where he is today,” Armstead’s mother, Mindy Brooks, told ABC News. “I’m not surprised because he was always a good person.”

Jeremiah Armstead, 19, began his freshman year at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee earlier this month after being recruited to play basketball

Jeremiah Armstead, 19, began his freshman year at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee earlier this month after being recruited to play basketball

The teenager was a sophomore in high school when he moved to California with his mother, brother and sister, who are now living in a domestic violence home

The teenager was a sophomore in high school when he moved to California with his mother, brother and sister, who are now living in a domestic violence home

Armstead (pictured with his mother, Mindy Brooks) and his family have also had to sleep in their car for the past three years while struggling with home insecurity

Armstead (pictured with his mother, Mindy Brooks) and his family have also had to sleep in their car for the past three years while struggling with home insecurity

Armstead’s family, coaches and community leaders all worked to help the basketball player get through to college while he balanced Housing insecurity with his high school workload.

Keisha Daniels, co-founder of the nonprofit Sister of Watts, approached We Educate Brilliant Minds on Armstead’s behalf. The organization helps students get into historically black colleges (HBCUs).

“I brought wisdom, of course, but it was difficult being homeless and juggling everything, like domestic violence situations, just stuff like that,” he told ABC News. “Living in a shelter, living in a car — it was hard to think, go to school, worry about my mom or my brother, my sister.”

Armstead, who graduated from Long Beach Polytechnic High School that spring, never told his friends that he was homeless. They often wondered why he was dropped from 7-Eleven

Armstead, who graduated from Long Beach Polytechnic High School that spring, never told his friends that he was homeless. They often wondered why he was dropped from 7-Eleven

Armstead's family, coaches and community leaders have all worked to help the basketball player get through to college

Armstead’s family, coaches and community leaders have all worked to help the basketball player get through to college

Armstead was staying with a friend when his mother called to say he'd been accepted into Fisk, a historically black college

Armstead was staying with a friend when his mother called to say he’d been accepted into Fisk, a historically black college

Armstead kept his family’s struggles with domestic violence and homelessness to himself. Brooks explained that his son’s friends were unaware of his situation and often wondered why he asked to be dropped off at 7-Eleven.

He was staying at a friend’s house the morning she called to say he’d been accepted into Fisk.

Armstead’s acceptance letter came complete with his student ID card welcoming him to the class of 2026, a symbol of all the hardships he had overcome.

A member of the Fisk University men's basketball team, he works alongside former LA Clippers basketball player Kenneth Anderson, who is the head coach

A member of the Fisk University men’s basketball team, he works alongside former LA Clippers basketball player Kenneth Anderson, who is the head coach

Armstead (pictured with his brother) has also motivated his younger siblings to think about college thanks to his success

Armstead (pictured with his brother) has also motivated his younger siblings to think about college thanks to his success

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“I just want to show people that in my circumstances, don’t stop,” Armstead told Good Morning America. ‘Never think about giving up because things could change just like that’

A member of the Fisk University men’s basketball team, he works alongside former LA Clippers basketball player Kenneth Anderson, who is the head coach.

Anderson told ABC News that he was impressed with the teenager’s demeanor and work ethic, which he felt would make him the right candidate for the team.

Armstead, who studies kinesiology, has also motivated his younger siblings to think about college thanks to his success.

“I just want to show people that in my circumstances, don’t stop,” he said. ‘Never think about giving up because things could change just like that.’

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-11157863/Homeless-teen-lands-spot-college-basketball-skills.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490 Homeless teenager lands a place in college for his basketball skills

Andrew Kugle

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