Hunter Biden’s tax charges were dismissed by a federal judge in Delaware after the “honey” plea deal failed

Hunter Biden’s tax charges were dismissed by a federal judge in Delaware after the “honey” plea deal failed

  • Judge Maryellen Noreika dismissed the charges in Delaware at the request of the prosecutor
  • The move leaves the president’s son vulnerable to new, potentially more serious, charges while Special Counsel David Weiss continues the investigation

Hunter Biden’s tax allegations were dismissed by a federal judge in Delaware after his so-called “sweetheart” plea deal fell dramatically.

After the deal fell through earlier this month, prosecutors asked District Judge Maryellen Noreika to dismiss the charges in Delaware, potentially allowing new charges to be filed in California or Washington, DC.

Hunter Biden’s attorneys did not dispute the move and Judge Noreika approved the motion Thursday.

The dismissed charges involved two tax offenses for not paying taxes on time in 2017 and 2018.

Without an agreement, Hunter could now face more serious charges from newly appointed Special Counsel David Weiss.

Hunter Biden's tax allegations were dismissed by a federal judge in Delaware after his so-called

Hunter Biden’s tax allegations were dismissed by a federal judge in Delaware after his so-called “sweetheart” plea deal fell dramatically

Judge Maryellen Noreika dismissed the charges in Delaware at the request of the prosecutor

Judge Maryellen Noreika dismissed the charges in Delaware at the request of the prosecutor

Biden appeared in court in Wilmington, Delaware last month. He was expected to plead guilty to two offences, but the settlement failed spectacularly

Biden appeared in court in Wilmington, Delaware last month. He was expected to plead guilty to two offences, but the settlement failed spectacularly

The president’s son may still be able to salvage a separate deal related to the gun charges, but that’s not clear yet.

The charges, which Jäger’s attorneys claim are still binding but prosecutors say never took effect, would allow the gun-possession charges to be dropped in two years if Biden stays out of legal trouble and passes the drug test.

The gun offense agreement also includes an immunity clause from federal prosecution for some other potential offenses.

In another recent twist, Biden’s defense attorney in the case, Christopher Clark, filed Tuesday to withdraw from the case.

Clark said he could be called as a witness in the negotiation and drafting of the deal and could not also act as his attorney. He was replaced by another Hunter Biden attorney, Abbe Lowell.

Attorney General Merrick Garland’s surprise announcement that he would appoint Weiss as a special counsel raised new questions about the case ahead of the 2024 election. Hunter Biden’s history of drug use and financial dealings followed his father’s political career.

The case comes amid the Justice Department’s indictments against former President Donald Trump – Joe Biden’s main rival in next year’s election.

Hunter’s case appeared to be drawing to a close when both sides announced in June that they had reached an agreement.

Hunter allegedly lied regarding a gun report (above) required for his gun transaction. A photo of the form shows that he answered

Hunter allegedly lied regarding a gun report (above) required for his gun transaction. A photo of the form shows that he answered “no” when asked if he was an “unlawful user of marijuana or any depressant, stimulant, narcotic or other controlled substance” or was addicted to it

However, the matter fell through at a hearing last month. Biden was expected to escape his prison sentence for pleading guilty to failing to pay taxes on more than $1.5 million in income in 2017 and 2018.

The two sides appeared to have differing views on how the deal should work, and the judge refused to sign it off without further clarity.

Weiss said one of the problems is that Biden and his attorney appear to have said he pled guilty to promises that weren’t in the deal.

“This was an issue entirely of their own making and did not result from the drafting of the proposed objection or diversion agreements,” he said.

Instead of disappearing, it means the case now hangs over the president as he runs for re-election next year.

Emma Colton

Janice Dean is a WSTPost U.S. News Reporter based in London. His focus is on U.S. politics and the environment. He has covered climate change extensively, as well as healthcare and crime. Janice Dean joined WSTPost in 2023 from the Daily Express and previously worked for Chemist and Druggist and the Jewish Chronicle. He is a graduate of Cambridge University. Languages: English. You can get in touch with me by emailing: janicedean@wstpost.com.

Related Articles

Back to top button