Indiana mom, 35, dies from drinking too much WATER – after drinking the equivalent of four bottles in 20 minutes

Indiana mom, 35, dies from drinking too much WATER – after drinking the equivalent of four bottles in 20 minutes

  • The mother-of-two reportedly drank 64 ounces of water in 20 minutes — the equivalent of a full day
  • After a day at the lake, the childminder said she wasn’t happy with the amount of water
  • READ MORE: How Can Drinking Too Much Water KILL YOU? DM.com explained

A childminder in Indiana died from water intoxication after drinking about 64 ounces in just 20 minutes.

Ashley Summers, mother of two, died at the age of 35, shortly after spending a relaxing day at Lake Freeman over the Fourth of July long weekend.

On the morning of the fourth she had been feeling light-headed and had a headache and signs of dehydration, but no large amount of water could quench her thirst.

When Ms. Summers returned home, she collapsed in her garage shortly after suffering severe brain swelling and never regained consciousness.

At the hospital, doctors diagnosed her with water poisoning, also known as hyponatremia, which occurs when there is too much water in the body and too little sodium.

Ashley Summers, 35, was a kindergarten teacher and mother of two. She passed away shortly after the July 4th holiday from water intoxication or hyponatremia

Ashley Summers, 35, was a kindergarten teacher and mother of two. She passed away shortly after the July 4th holiday from water intoxication or hyponatremia

Ms. Summers loved being on the water. On the final day of her trip, Ms. Summers complained of dehydration, headaches and light-headedness

Ms. Summers loved being on the water. On the final day of her trip, Ms. Summers complained of dehydration, headaches and light-headedness

Hyponatremia is characterized by insufficient levels of sodium in the body, an essential electrolyte that helps regulate the delicate fluid balance within cells and maintain proper nerve and muscle function. Drinking too much water decreases the concentration of sodium in the blood

Hyponatremia is characterized by insufficient levels of sodium in the body, an essential electrolyte that helps regulate the delicate fluid balance within cells and maintain proper nerve and muscle function. Drinking too much water decreases the concentration of sodium in the blood

When Ashley Summers’ brother, Devon Miller, heard about his sister’s condition, he was incredulous.

He called: “It was a big shock to all of us.” I just thought, “Is that a thing?”

Mr. Miller added, ‘She just felt like she wasn’t getting enough water…Once they left the sandbar and arrived at the dock, the boat ride was about 20 minutes…she drank four bottles of water in those 20 minutes.’

The Summers family took a weekend boat trip to Lake Freeman, a popular summertime destination about 80 miles north of Indianapolis. According to her brother, Ashley loved being on the water.

The family had vacationed locally from Saturday 1 July to Tuesday 4 July.

On Tuesday morning, Ms Summers’ family said she was feeling dehydrated and could not drink enough water to quench her thirst.

On Tuesday evening, Mr. Miller received a disturbing call about Ashley from his other sister. She had collapsed in her garage and was taken to Indiana University Health Arnett Hospital.

He said, “My sister Holly called me and she was just an absolute wreck.” She added, “Ashley’s in the hospital. She has brain swelling, they don’t know what’s causing it, they don’t know what to do to make it go away and it’s not looking good.”

Ms Summers never regained consciousness and doctors diagnosed her with water intoxication

Water intoxication occurs when someone drinks too much water within a narrow window of time, overtaxing the ability of the body’s complex organ systems, most notably the kidneys, to regulate fluid balance.

The ultimate goal is to create a balance between water and electrolytes like sodium, potassium, and chloride that ensures proper cellular function. Sodium is particularly important for its ability to maintain communication between cells via electrical impulses.

Sodium also aids in the absorption of nutrients in the digestive system and kidneys, which regulates the amount of water and electrolytes that are reabsorbed into the bloodstream or excreted in the urine.

Bradford Betz

Bradford Betz is a WSTPost U.S. News Reporter based in London. His focus is on U.S. politics and the environment. He has covered climate change extensively, as well as healthcare and crime. Bradford Betz joined WSTPost in 2023 from the Daily Express and previously worked for Chemist and Druggist and the Jewish Chronicle. He is a graduate of Cambridge University. Languages: English. You can get in touch with me by emailing: betz@ustimespost.com.

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