Optus executive won’t answer questions about data breaches affecting 11 million customers

An Optus executive turned red-faced after claiming on live radio that every customer affected by Australia’s biggest-ever cyberattack had been notified – only for a victim to call and claim they hadn’t been told .

An estimated 11.2 million Optus customers may have had their personal addresses, dates of birth, phone numbers, passport details and driver’s licenses compromised in last week’s data breach.

A mysterious hacker who claims to be behind the breach has since demanded Optus hand over a ransom of $1.5 million in cryptocurrency Monero or they will release the data.

On Monday, Sally Oelerich — the telecom company’s director of corporate affairs for regulatory and public affairs — dialed into the 2GB breakfast program and said: “For customers whose data was compromised as a result of this attack, we have now informed them.”

But customer Casey Robinson then called and reported that her husband’s account had been hacked and personal information, such as his phone number, had been compromised as early as September 12.

Optus Director of Corporate Affairs Regulatory and Public Affairs Sally Oelerich was red-faced as she told 2GB's Chris Smith that all affected Optus customers had been contacted by the telco - only for a woman to call and say it hadn't be

Optus Director of Corporate Affairs Regulatory and Public Affairs Sally Oelerich was red-faced as she told 2GB’s Chris Smith that all affected Optus customers had been contacted by the telco – only for a woman to call and say it hadn’t be

A mysterious hacker who claims to be behind the breach has since demanded Optus hand over a ransom of $1.5 million in cryptocurrency Monero or they will release the data

A mysterious hacker who claims to be behind the breach has since demanded Optus hand over a ransom of $1.5 million in cryptocurrency Monero or they will release the data

When Mr Smith asked if the telecom company had contacted Ms Robinson, she said they had contacted Optus themselves.

‘You haven’t been informed by Optus what to do with your accounts?’ said the radio host.

“Not at all, not a single email,” Ms. Robinson replied.

Mr Smith then put the question to Mrs Oelerich.

“You said you’ve contacted everyone you think had their data compromised?” he said.

2GB radio host Chris Smith asked Optus board several questions about the breach, which may have affected more than 11 million customers

2GB radio host Chris Smith asked Optus board several questions about the breach, which may have affected more than 11 million customers

Ms. Oelerich replied: “As a result of this attack.”

‘You say Casey’s scenario doesn’t fit the circumstances!?’ Mr Smith struck back.

Ms Oelerich then stumbled before apologizing to Ms Robinson for breaching her husband’s data.

“I wouldn’t wish that on my worst enemy,” she said.

The executive then said all Optus customers affected by the breach had been contacted by the telecom company before Mr Smith indicated that this was not the case.

“I don’t think so, well I don’t know Casey’s individual circumstances or her partner,” she said before asking for Ms Robinson’s details and promising to follow up on her affair personally.

At the beginning of the chaotic interview, Ms. Oelerich said she herself was a victim of the cyber attack and her driver’s license number was compromised.

She dodged several questions about claims the hackers were behind the attack, instead telling Mr. Smith that the matter was being investigated.

It is estimated that 11.2 million Optus customers had their personal addresses, dates of birth, phone numbers, passport details and driver's licenses compromised

It is estimated that 11.2 million Optus customers had their personal addresses, dates of birth, phone numbers, passport details and driver’s licenses compromised

She added that the alleged hackers did not contact Optus directly and could not “validate that this is even legitimate”.

Tech experts believe the hacker’s claims are legitimate, but Ms Oelerich declined to answer whether she thought it was real or not, saying she was doing everything she’d been advised to “protect customers.” “.

The ransom note surfaced on an online forum on Saturday morning, with the hackers warning the telecom company it had a week to respond.

“Optus if you read! The price for us not to sell data is $1,000,000. We’re giving you a week to decide,” read part of the message.

The warning comes as Optus customers vent their frustration on social media, with some claiming it took three days for Optus to start contacting them personally.

Pictured: Optus CEO Kelly Bayer Rosemary

Pictured: Optus CEO Kelly Bayer Rosemary

On Friday morning, CEO Kelly Bayer Rosemary issued an emotional apology to the millions of Optus customers whose data had been compromised.

She confirmed payment details and account passwords were protected, but admitted she felt “terrible” the breach happened under her watch.

“I think it’s a mix of a lot of different emotions,” she said, looking down.

“Of course I’m angry that there are people out there who want to do this to our customers, I’m disappointed that we couldn’t have prevented it.

“I’m very sorry and I apologize. It shouldn’t have happened.’

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11248919/Optus-executive-fails-answer-questions-data-breach-affects-11-million-customers.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490 Optus executive won’t answer questions about data breaches affecting 11 million customers

Emma Colton

WSTPost is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – admin@wstpost.com. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Related Articles

Back to top button