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Qanon conspiracy theorist moves from US to Australia

The conspiracy theorist believed to be behind the cult, which believes Satan-worshipping, cannibalistic child molesters control the world, is moving to Australia

  • The conspiracy theorist believed to be behind QAnon has relocated to Australia
  • QAnon believes the world is controlled by satanic, cannibalistic child molesters
  • Ron Watkins is believed to be behind QAnon and is the site administrator for 8kun
  • 8kun has become an imageboard for conspiracy theorists and the far right
  • QAnon Anonymous podcast host Julian Feeld claims Watkins is in Sydney

A prominent US conspiracy theorist allegedly behind the QAnon movement has been spotted in Australia with evidence he may be staying Down Under.

Ron Watkins is the site administrator of 8kun, formerly known as 8Chan, an internet image board that has become a base for conspiracy theories, the far right, white supremacy, and Nazism.

The American, using the anonymous account name “Q,” played a major role in spreading the QAnon conspiracy theory that claims the world is controlled by satana-worshipping cannibal child molesters on the websites 4chan, 8chan, and 8kun.

Watkins also promoted misinformation about Covid-19 and the conspiracy theory that Joe Biden beat Donald Trump in the 2020 US presidential election for voter fraud.

QAnon Anonymous podcast host Julian Feeld explained on Twitter that an anonymous source revealed to him that Ron Watkins (pictured) was spotted in Sydney and was planning to relocate on July 26

QAnon Anonymous podcast host Julian Feeld explained on Twitter that an anonymous source revealed to him that Ron Watkins (pictured) was spotted in Sydney and was planning to relocate on July 26

The QAnon conspiracy theory claims that the world is controlled by Satan-worshipping cannibal child molesters. Pictured: Images of the January 6, 2021 riot at the US Capitol, in which many QAnon believers stormed the government building

The QAnon conspiracy theory claims that the world is controlled by Satan-worshipping cannibal child molesters. Pictured: Images of the January 6, 2021 riot at the US Capitol, in which many QAnon believers stormed the government building

QAnon Anonymous podcast host Julian Feeld shared a post on his Twitter account on Wednesday claiming that Watkins is in Sydney and intends to live in Australia.

Feeld, who has spent years researching and debunking conspiracy theories, says he got the information from a source who asked to remain anonymous.

“Ron Watkins was in Sydney, Australia with the apparent intention of settling there on July 26,” he wrote.

The odd coincidence that Watkins was sighted on July 26 was that he was in the process of running for the GOP nomination for Congress in Arizona.

Watkins finished last of seven Republican candidates, an announcement made a week after he was reportedly in Sydney.

Feeld noted this in his tweet, saying it explained the conspiracy theorist’s “recent absence” from the US.

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US conspiracy theorist Ron Watkins (pictured) is said to be behind the QAnon movement. It is said that he now resides in Australia after traveling from the US

Watkins has previously made posts on Telegram – an online messaging service with improved encryption and privacy settings – complaining about Australia’s response to Covid-19.

Like many other conspiracy theorists and those with far-right views, he targeted Australia’s government lockdowns, vaccination requirements and gun laws.

But Feeld added that Watkins has since deleted “several posts related to Australia” from Telegram after it was reported he was in Sydney.

Daily Mail Australia has reached out to Julian Feeld for comment.

QAnon started as a fringe group on a 4chan internet forum in 2017, but grew into a global movement promoting wild conspiracies.

Demonstrators from conspiracy theorist QAnon protest during a rally to reopen California and the stay-at-home guidelines in San Diego, May 1, 2020

Demonstrators from conspiracy theorist QAnon protest during a rally to reopen California and the stay-at-home guidelines in San Diego, May 1, 2020

Watkins has denied posting on internet forums under the anonymous “Q” account, but has supported QAnon conspiracy theories.

QAnon supporters were part of the group of insurgents that stormed the US Capitol building on January 6 to stop the certification of the results of the 2020 presidential election.

In March, supporters of the “Q” account floated the theory that a speech by President Joe Biden on Russia’s cybersecurity threat was a call for corporations to cement a “new world order” with a “shadow government.”

Other QAnon supporters believed that John F. Kennedy Jr., who died in a plane crash in 1999, faked his death and would come back after Donald Trump to lead the country.

A poll conducted last year by the Public Religion Research Institute found that 15 percent of Americans believe in QAnon’s core principles.

The FBI has classified the movement as a terrorist threat.

Watkins has denied posting on internet forums under the anonymous “Q” account, but has supported QAnon conspiracy theories. Pictured: QAnon believers are seen at a Trump rally in 2020

Watkins has denied posting on internet forums under the anonymous “Q” account, but has supported QAnon conspiracy theories. Pictured: QAnon believers are seen at a Trump rally in 2020

QAnon: America’s Most Loud Pro-Trump Conspiracy Theorist Group

Origins: Q non started on fringe website 4chan, where a poster calling itself Q left messages claiming to be a senior federal official and pretending to reveal a “deep state” cabal that intended to bringing down Donald Trump. Q emerged from the discredited “Pizzagate” conspiracy that had senior Democrats engaged in pedophilia and cannibalism in the basement of a Washington DC restaurant, but quickly picked up steam when “Q” left “clues” and claimed Trump would bring him down from the deep Country. Whenever the conspiracies are proven untrue, followers argue that the inaccuracies are part of Q’s larger plan.

Who is Q?: Multiple people can now impersonate Q on 4chan’s anonymous boards

A QAnon supporter blocked the bridge near Hoover Dam with a homemade tank on behalf of the movement and later pleaded guilty to terrorism

A QAnon supporter blocked the bridge near Hoover Dam with a homemade tank on behalf of the movement and later pleaded guilty to terrorism

Hoover Dam: In June 2019, 32-year-old Matthew Wright, a QAnon contributor, blocked the bridge near Hoover Dam in Arizona with a homemade armored vehicle in a 90-minute standoff. He pleaded guilty to terrorism charges and has written two letters from prison to Donald Trump containing the opt-out that has become the QAnon motto: “Where we go, we all go.”

Michael Flynn: Trump’s former national security adviser became a martyr figure for QAnon believers after receiving a plea deal from Special Counsel Robert Mueller and admitting he lied about his Russia contacts. The QAnon conspiracy has led Flynn to plead guilty to being a deep state persecuted victim — and some even claim he is “Q.”

Many believers place three-star emojis next to their Twitter names. But the retired three-star general has denounced all ties to the group and withdrew from attending an event after discovering it was being hosted by a QAnon believer.

QAnon believers are martyring former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn after striking a plea deal with Robert Mueller

QAnon believers are martyring former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn after striking a plea deal with Robert Mueller

Political candidates for QAnon: Jo Rae Perkins, 64, won the Oregon Republican primary in May and ran for a Senate seat against incumbent Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley. “I stand by Q and the team,” she said when asked about her interest in the group. She insisted she visit QAnon message boards as a “source of information,” claiming the media was too focused on the group. Perkins won 49 percent of the vote against three other Republicans.

Marjorie Taylor Greene came first in the Republican primary in a deep red district in Georgia and was elected to the US House of Representatives in November 2020. She claims to have stopped believing in QAnon in 2018 but continues to make controversial statements. and had to apologize in June for comparing mask mandates to the Holocaust

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Bradford Betz

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