San Francisco resident attacked by homeless woman after telling her not to smoke fentanyl near a children’s playground

A San Francisco resident said he was attacked by a homeless woman after telling her to stop smoking fentanyl near a children’s playground.

Darren Stallcup was walking through the neighborhood when he spotted several smoking drug users in the immediate vicinity of the park – and said there were no cops around to remedy the situation.

In the video, the woman, who appears to be standing in her own tent on the sidewalk, can be heard saying she “doesn’t care” and that she can “smoke wherever she wants”.

Then you see people smoking drugs lining the wall immediately adjacent to the playground where children have been seen and heard playing in broad daylight.

Darren Stallcup says he was attacked when he told this homeless woman near the children's playground in San Francisco to quit smoking

Darren Stallcup says he was attacked when he told this homeless woman near the children’s playground in San Francisco to quit smoking

Then you see people smoking drugs lining the wall immediately adjacent to the playground where children have been seen and heard playing in broad daylight

Then you see people smoking drugs lining the wall immediately adjacent to the playground where children have been seen and heard playing in broad daylight

Stallcup shared the video with the caption,

Stallcup shared the video with the caption, “San Francisco.” Woman attacks me for telling her not to smoke fentanyl near the kids playground. Behind her, more than 5 people smoke fentanyl next to the children’s playground.

Stallcup shared the video with the caption, “San Francisco.” Woman attacks me for telling her not to smoke fentanyl near the kids playground. Behind her, more than 5 people smoke fentanyl next to a children’s playground.

“Several San Francisco police cars, no officer in sight.” Children need a fentanyl-free environment, not fentanyl-free. That’s a damn shame.

Darren Stallcup was walking through the neighborhood when he spotted several drug users smoking in the immediate vicinity of the park

Darren Stallcup was walking through the neighborhood when he spotted several drug users smoking in the immediate vicinity of the park

“Our founding fathers, troops who fought for our country, my grandma and grandpa, your grandma and grandpa, all wallowing in their graves.”

“Local San Francisco leaders will resign if they still have divinity or respect for our community. ‘God help us all.’

In a follow-up tweet, he said, “It’s troubling to receive death threats while trying to raise awareness of the serious dangers of fentanyl.”

“Fentanyl is harmful to people of all races, creeds and religions… and it’s disheartening to encounter such animosity.”

“By raising awareness of the dangers of fentanyl, we can save more lives.” More lives is good. If one of these old school crack heads from San Francisco wants to threaten me, so be it.

“There’s nothing else going on in their lives.” “Miserable, mean-spirited fellows who have nothing better to do than threaten a white boy.”

A homeless man on the streets of Union Square in San Francisco

A homeless man on the streets of Union Square in San Francisco

In the past three months, local and state law enforcement agencies have seized over 100 kilos of narcotics -- including 56 kilos of fentanyl -- in San Francisco's Tenderloin and South of Market counties

In the past three months, local and state law enforcement agencies have seized over 100 kilos of narcotics — including 56 kilos of fentanyl — in San Francisco’s Tenderloin and South of Market counties

Homeless and drug users on the streets of San Francisco's southern Market District

Homeless and drug users on the streets of San Francisco’s southern Market District

San Francisco's once-bustling Union Square is facing an exodus of businesses, residents and tourists caused by the city's lax approach to crime, homelessness and outdoor drug use

San Francisco’s once-bustling Union Square is facing an exodus of businesses, residents and tourists caused by the city’s lax approach to crime, homelessness and outdoor drug use

Groups of people take drugs on the streets of San Francisco

Groups of people take drugs on the streets of San Francisco

In the past three months, local and state law enforcement agencies have seized over 100 kilos of narcotics — including 56 kilos of fentanyl — in San Francisco’s Tenderloin and South of Market counties.

According to the San Francisco Attorney’s Office, three hundred people have been arrested under drug laws and pending warrants.

Mayor London Breed said in a statement: “Closing open air drug markets is vital to the safety of our neighborhoods and the overall health of our city.”

“We will continue to offer assistance to people in crisis, but we must hold accountable those who harm our communities.”

San Francisco is also part of Operation Overdrive — a Department of Justice initiative created to help local authorities take down criminal drug networks.

District Attorney Brooke Jenkins said, “I am grateful to all of the local, state and federal partners who have come together to share resources and work together to shut down open-air drug markets and take back our neighborhoods.”

Shockingly, this week in San Francisco, five people overdosed on fentanyl within 24 hours. Two of them were fatal, reports the SF Chronicle.

Police said it was likely a “bad batch” trafficked in the area.

The city, which has had more than 2,200 overdose deaths since 2020, is plagued by Honduran drug dealers, who are lured to the city and able to thrive because of its lax drug policies – some earning more than $350,000 a year.

In August alone, San Francisco reported nearly 1,670 auto burglaries, contributing to the city’s nearly 10,000 vehicle thefts that year.

Criminals often engage in bipping and boosting, smashing car windows and speeding away, often targeting multiple parked vehicles in a single day.

Last month in San Francisco, thieves were caught on camera cruising the streets in a Lexus, stopping at parked cars, breaking windows and stealing valuables inside.

One SUV even had a person in the back seat when the windows were smashed, but the thief still grabbed the victim’s bag before escaping in the waiting Lexus.

Signs are dotted around the city warning residents and tourists not to leave anything in their cars, but the crime rate remains stubbornly high.

Tourist areas like North Beach, Japantown and Presidio have the highest rates of car burglaries per 10,000 residents.

Due to rising crime and drug use in the city, several grocery stores have closed their doors in recent months.

Emma Colton

Janice Dean is a WSTPost U.S. News Reporter based in London. His focus is on U.S. politics and the environment. He has covered climate change extensively, as well as healthcare and crime. Janice Dean joined WSTPost in 2023 from the Daily Express and previously worked for Chemist and Druggist and the Jewish Chronicle. He is a graduate of Cambridge University. Languages: English. You can get in touch with me by emailing: janicedean@wstpost.com.

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