Tesco boss reveals shops are stepping up security over shoplifting fears as the cost of a pickle hits £1

The price of vegetables will skyrocket as the cost of living crisis deepens, with some even doubling as everyday items become less affordable for Brits.

Cucumbers, now around 60p, could soar to over £1 next year as energy prices for vegetable growers continue to rise.

The news comes as Tesco’s boss said the supermarket had taken extra security precautions over shoplifting.

Tesco chairman John Allan, 74, warned that huge price hikes could lead to more theft by “desperate people” who can’t afford groceries.

Speaking to Times Radio, he said: “I think shoplifting is a problem and getting the police to take action and respond to cases… that’s a problem in all retail.

“I don’t sympathize with shoplifters, but I can understand that desperate people take desperate measures – sometimes when they’re literally out of money.”

The price of pickles could double for shoppers from 60p to over £1 as the cost of everyday items soars

The price of pickles could double for shoppers from 60p to over £1 as the cost of everyday items soars

Tesco chairman John Allan, 74, told Times Radio there was

Tesco chairman John Allan, 74, told Times Radio there was “concern” about an increase in shoplifting by “desperate people” affected by the cost of living crisis (pictured on the BBC in February).

“We provide increased security in the stores most affected by shoplifting, but we only do so selectively.”

Mr Allan added he was concerned about the impact of the financial crisis on the UK’s high streets.

He said: “I worry about high streets where smaller businesses are being pushed beyond what they can handle.

“So I think emptying our high street is a real risk over the next year or two as smaller businesses and other retailers have to close and/or go out of business.”

The rising cost of vegetables is the latest strain on shoppers’ wallets as once-cheap goods become more expensive.

Cucumber growers have expressed fears about the cost of living crisis, as soaring gas and electricity costs make production more expensive and losses are passed on to consumers.

There are around 45 cucumber growers in the UK, mainly in the Lea Valley north of London.

The cost of growing the vegetable is particularly high as cucumbers need to be constantly stored at 18ºC and require heaters during winter and at night.

Although long considered a British staple, cucumbers originated in India and are energy-intensive to store at the right temperature.

The price of the huge energy bill required to do this has skyrocketed.

The cost of a gas boiler – a unit of measure for gas – has risen from 50p five years ago to £7.30 for cucumber growers.

According to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, the UK imported 169,200 tonnes of cucumbers last year, triple the amount produced domestically.

Ian Bedford of the Cucumber Growers’ Association said growers are deeply concerned about the UK’s cost of living crisis.

He said: “Prices need to go above £1 for growers to make a living. Farmers are afraid of next year. The predictions [for gas prices] are crazy.’

Rising energy costs for growers make going to the vegetable aisle more expensive than ever

Rising energy costs for growers make going to the vegetable aisle more expensive than ever

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With Brits already dealing with a double whammy of high fuel and rising energy prices, an analysis by MailOnline has found that a four-pin carton of milk costs on average 34p more today than it did 12 months ago. The cost of an average 500g pack of own-brand spaghetti has also risen by 33p since August last year – from 52p to 85p – while a 500g pack of Lurpak is now 63p more expensive – from 3.58 £ last year to £4.21 this year

Rising production costs have hit producers across the food industry – largely driven by rising energy prices – making shopping bills increasingly expensive for Brits.

The cost of shopping basket staples, including milk, butter and pasta, has risen by as much as 20 percent, MailOnline analysis shows.

The cost of an average pack of own-brand spaghetti has risen from 33p to 52p to 85p in the last year, while a 500g pack of Lurpak has risen by 63p to £4.21.

Now, an average six-pack of Heniz beans can cost up to £5 and a single can can cost up to £1.20 – 37p more than a year ago.

An average basket of 20 items is now around £5.20 more than at the same time last year as consumers feel the effects of rising costs.

Brits have reported trying to cut costs by reducing takeaways, eating out and supermarket ingredients.

New research from findr.com has shown that 96 per cent of Britons are cutting down at least one thing to save money as the prices of almost everything including fuel, food and energy rise and costs are set to rise even further over the next year.

The figures show that just one in 25 people will be able to move on without making lifestyle changes as the UK is hit by runaway inflation and a huge rise in the cost of living.

Many are taking even more drastic steps to save money, with trends on TikTok encouraging people to shower at the gym and charge their phones at work, among other things, to keep costs down.

Electricity bills will see perhaps the most noticeable increase in costs for Brits, as Ofgem’s price cap is set to rise from £1,971 to £3,549 in October.

It is feared the energy bill price cap could hit a staggering £7,263 by April next year.

Millions of households will struggle to pay their bills this winter and experts fear families’ savings could be wiped out by rising costs.

Many have suggested they may refuse to pay their energy bills as spiraling costs spiral out of the reach of households.

Money savings expert Martin Lewis said he feared civil unrest if the crisis deepened and urged the government to take emergency action to ease the financial burden on millions.

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Supermarket shoppers, already facing tight living expenses, are now paying up to 20 percent more for staples like butter, milk and spaghetti, new figures revealed today. Figures are from Trolley.co.uk's Grocery Price Index data. The cost of the items are averages that include different sizes and brands. For example, milk includes organic and larger cartons. Images are an illustration and do not represent the actual price of the products

Supermarket shoppers, already facing tight living expenses, are now paying up to 20 percent more for staples like butter, milk and spaghetti, new figures revealed today. Figures are from Trolley.co.uk’s Grocery Price Index data. The cost of the items are averages that include different sizes and brands. For example, milk includes organic and larger cartons. Images are an illustration and do not represent the actual price of the products

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11178209/Price-CUCUMBERS-rise-60p-1-year-growers-UK-make-living.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490 Tesco boss reveals shops are stepping up security over shoplifting fears as the cost of a pickle hits £1

Emma Colton

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