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The American expat shares a VERY long list of “culture shocks” she experienced in Australia

The American expat shares a VERY long list of “culture shocks” she faced in Australia – from the “stressful” way people drive to eating at restaurants

  • An American expat has revealed eight things that shocked her in Australia
  • The woman added Aussies, shortening every word on the detailed list
  • She was also pleased that her jaw dropped when the C-word was casually used around her

An American expat has revealed a list of things that have shocked her since moving to Australia.

Tate Duane, who posts under the name Tatesescape, revealed she was confused about everything from the way Australians drive and talk to the food served in restaurants.

First on the list is that Australians drive across the road – which is “stressful” for them.

“I’ve lived abroad before, I’ve driven on the wrong side of the road, but for some reason watching people drive here stresses me out,” she said.

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Tate Duane, who posts under the name Tatesescape, revealed she was confused about everything from the way Australians drive and talk to the food served in restaurants

Tate Duane, who posts under the name Tatesescape, revealed she was confused about everything from the way Australians drive and talk to the food served in restaurants

Turning left scares her the most—while struggling with rules about not turning right “on red.”

The second shock is that Australians like to abbreviate their words: “Every word is abbreviated even if it doesn’t need to be abbreviated,” she said.

“The other day a lady came in and ordered two caps and I thought she said two cups so I handed her two cups but she wanted two cappuccinos.”

She said the word ‘keen’ is never used in the US – but she’s heard it used a lot since coming to Australia.

“I think it’s so funny. Like when people write “KEEEEEN” when they’re so excited about something,” she said.

She went on to compare US trades and those from Australia.

“All of our plumbers in the US are stereotyped like these older men. Everyone is so young here. Like all electricians, plumbers, miners,’ she said.

She then said that Asian food is a “yes” in Australia, while Mexican food is a “no”.

What are Tate’s top eight culture shocks after moving to Australia?

1 – Australians shorten every single word – including cappuccino to cap

2 – The use of the word “excited” to express excitement

3 – Craftsmen are young – not old

4 – The music in clubs is techno and British rap

5 – The casual use of the C-word

6 – Driving on the left and red light rules, ie not being able to turn right on a red light

7 – Asian food is great, but Mexican food is not

8 – There are no squirrels

She also pointed out that British rap and techno music is everywhere – which is “wild” for an American to experience.

She added, “The fact that there are no squirrels on this entire continent blows my mind,” she said. “How did this happen?”

She then points to the use of the C-word – something many Australians are comfortable with – while it’s still very much taboo in the US.

She then points to the use of the C-word - something many Australians are comfortable with - while it's still very much taboo in the US

She then points to the use of the C-word – something many Australians are comfortable with – while it’s still very much taboo in the US

“My jaw dropped the first time I heard it being tossed around so casually,” she admitted.

Despite the huge list of culture shockers, Tate says she loves being in Australia.

“I’ll probably never go,” she said.

People also took the opportunity to enlighten the young traveler in the comments.

“Right on red would get you over traffic and you would die,” said one woman.

“What we lack in squirrels we make up for in possums,” added another.

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https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/real-life/article-11166871/American-expat-shares-lengthy-list-culture-shocks-shes-faced-Australia.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490 The American expat shares a VERY long list of “culture shocks” she experienced in Australia

Bradford Betz

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