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Treasure hunters discover swastika coins proving Hitler’s men were in the Polish palace

Treasure hunters searching for Nazi gold on the grounds of an 18th-century palace in Poland have found scattered World War II-era German coins.

The six Reichsbank pfennigs, clearly marked with swastikas, were uncovered in the castle in the village of Minkowskie when workers cleared earth at one of the three sites examined.

The 1 pfennig coins of 1942, 1944 and 1945 each bear the name Reichsbank, which was the central bank of the German Reich from 1876 to 1945.

Bart Zelaytys of the Silesian Bridge Foundation, which is leading the hunt, posted the find on YouTube and said: “The guys have been working at this place sorting the sand and we have a small find right here.

“We have six pfennigs, Reichspfennigs, and as you can see, the years are 1942 to 1945.

“We have a few swastikas. So what does it mean? Well, Nazis were here. They were here. We know exactly.’

Bart Zelaytys shows the six coins found in Minkowskie in the palm of his hand

Bart Zelaytys shows the six coins found in Minkowskie in the palm of his hand

Mr Zelaytys (pictured) and his team found a metal canister buried 30 feet below the surface of an old orangery in the ruins of a palace in Poland

Mr Zelaytys (pictured) and his team found a metal canister buried 30 feet below the surface of an old orangery in the ruins of a palace in Poland

The six Nazi-era coins were found next to what Zelaytys described as a

The six Nazi-era coins were found next to what Zelaytys described as a “small spring of water” (centre image).

The six one-pfennig coins were minted between 1942 and 1945

The six one-pfennig coins were minted between 1942 and 1945

In May of this year, the group discovered a metal canister buried 30 feet below the surface of an ancient orangery in the palace’s 14-acre park.

Treasures are believed to be buried there, stolen on orders from SS chief Heinrich Himmler to establish a Fourth Reich.

The canister is believed to contain the so-called “Gold of Wrocław” that disappeared from the police headquarters in what is now the Polish city of Wrocław, and is believed to also contain jewelry and valuables from the private collections of wealthy Germans living in Poland of the city lived region.

In order to protect their valuable possessions from the advancing Red Army, the wealthy Germans handed over their loot to the SS.

Secret documents, the diary of an SS officer and a map given to the treasure hunters by the descendants of officers of a secret lodge more than 1000 years old revealed the location.

The same diary, said to have been written by a senior SS officer, is also said to reveal the location of another palace in the region, said to have 28 tons of treasure buried at the bottom of a well.

Among the bundle of documents is a letter from a high-ranking SS officer named von Stein to one of the girls who worked at the palace in Minkowskie and later became his mistress.

The officer wrote: “My dear Inge, I will do my job, with God’s will. Some transports were successful. I hereby entrust you with the remaining 48 heavy Reichsbank crates and all family crates.

“Only you know where they are. May God help you and help me to fulfill my mission.’

The penciled pages of the diary are said to identify 11 locations throughout Lower Silesia that were German territory before and during the war.

An entry dated March 12, 1945, relating to the treasure in the castle in Minkowskie, states: “A trough was dug in the orangery, which is a safe ‘home’ for the chests and containers that were delivered.”

It goes on to say: “48 Reichsbank crates, in good condition, were hidden, very well covered with earth and “greened” with plants that were still alive.

“Let Providence watch over us.”

After getting permission to start digging for the canister, the Silesian Bridge Foundation has now discovered two more locations where they think other Lannisters with other treasure may be hiding.

The six Nazi-era coins were found next to what Zelaytys described as a ‘small water spring’.

He said, “Why would they throw coins into a water well?

“Well, maybe for a congratulations, hoping you’ll come back. Hoping you’ll return to a place where you left something behind.

“It gives us a nice boost of optimism.”

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11176483/Treasure-hunters-discover-Swastika-marked-coins-prove-Hitlers-men-Polish-palace.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490 Treasure hunters discover swastika coins proving Hitler’s men were in the Polish palace

Andrew Kugle

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